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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

1 edition of identification of Douglas-fir wood. found in the catalog.

identification of Douglas-fir wood.

identification of Douglas-fir wood.

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, Wis .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Douglas fir -- Identification.,
  • Wood -- Identification.

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesU.S. Forest Service research note FPL -- 010.
    ContributionsForest Products Laboratory (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination2 p. ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16124541M

    Fir, genus of more than 40 species of evergreen trees of the conifer family Pinaceae. The plants are native to North and Central America, Europe, Asia, and northern Africa. Several species are useful as a source of timber, and a number are cultivated as ornamentals. Fir wood can go either way and be ideal for use in construction or shoddy and undesirable, depending on the species. Douglas fir woods are strong and ideal, with straight grains that are the result of long, straight trunks. Their wood is resilient and therefore a favorite choice for many people in various trades.

    Price is per BDFT (unless otherwise stated below). Lengths are not listed due to varying stock, please add to cart to receive an official quote from our sales team. For USA customers only: As of November we are no longer able to ship softwoods into the United States. Please read the statement under "International Shipping" on this page or contact us for more details on how we can help you. Two varieties of this species are currently recognized: Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirbel) Franco var. glauca (Beissn.) Franco and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirbel) Franco var. menziesii). Uses Ethnobotanic: Douglas-fir needles were made into a tea and drank by Isleta Puebloans in New Mexico to cure rheumatism.

    This site includes descriptions and imagery of nearly 60 species of common, and not-so-common, lumber species found throughout the U.S. and Canada. This is the third edition of this site containing nearly twice as many species, higher resolution imagery and more in-depth descriptions of each species. Douglas Fir. The Douglas fir, ironically, is not a true fir. This tree commonly grows in the Pacific Northwest in the United States, where it is harvested for its superior lumber.


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Identification of Douglas-fir wood Download PDF EPUB FB2

Douglas fir, genus of about six species of evergreen trees of the conifer family Pinaceae, native to western North America and eastern Asia.

They are important timber trees and produce strong wood. Several are grown as ornamentals and are common Christmas trees in North America. Douglas Fir is a popular Christmas tree, mostly because it is typically less expensive than other species. Names: David Douglas, the Scottish botanist, is honored in the common name for Douglas Fir.

Another Scott, Archibald Menzies, is honored by the scientific name, menziesii. Pseudotsuga menziesii is an evergreen conifer species in the pine family, is native to western North America and is known as Douglas fir, Douglas-fir, Oregon pine, and Columbian pine.

There are two varieties: coast Douglas-fir (P. menziesii var. menziesii), and Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir (P. menziesii var. glauca). The massive mega-genome of Douglas fir has been sequenced in Class: Pinopsida. Over woods covered.

Over full-page wood profiles Over half-page wood profiles Data on over related species. Douglas-fir is the name of an entire genus of trees that contains six species--two native to North America and four native to eastern Asia.

Because of its similarity to other genera, Douglas-fir has given botanists fits. It has, at various times, been called a pine, a spruce, a hemlock, and a true fir. Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) is one of the world’s best-known and most widely used wood species.

In British Columbia, there are two varieties of Douglas-fir: Coastal and Interior. The sapwood is light in colour and of narrow width.

The heartwood ranges from yellowish to reddish-brown. Earlywood and latewood have a pronounced difference in colour, the latewood having darker, more.

Allergies/Toxicity: Although severe reactions are quite uncommon, Douglas-Fir has been reported to cause skin irritation, nausea, giddiness, runny nose, along with an increased likelihood of splinters getting infected.

See the articles Wood Allergies and Toxicity and Wood Dust Safety for more information. SLOWLY BUT SURELY. I’m slowly grinding my way through roughly wood species that have still yet to be listed on the site. I’m working my way alphabetically by botanical name, so check out the latest added wood to see where I’m at in the queue.

The following techniques and recommendations don’t necessarily have a wide application in initially sorting out wood species and eliminating large swaths of wood species, but will most likely be of use only as a final step in special identification circumstances.

Odor. Believe it or not, freshly machined wood can have a very identifiable. The Common North American Douglas Fir. Douglas fir is one of the most important timber trees on earth in terms of forest products.

It can grow large over centuries but will usually be harvested within a century because of its wood value. The good news is that it is a common non-endangered tree and the most plentiful western conifer in North.

Douglas fir is one of the most versatile of the domestic wood species, with uses that include plywood, heavy construction, studding, floor boards, roof trusses, floor and ceiling joists, beams. Other Species Easily Confused With: Western and eastern hemlock, true firs Means of Distinguishing Similar Species: Douglas-fir has resin canals and a characteristic odor when wet whereas the hemlocks and true firs have neither.

Douglas fir mostly grows in western North America, and is often used as structural or construction lumber or a veneer over plywood. In terms of appearance, Douglas fir usually has a light-brown color with a touch of red or yellow in-between darker growth rings, although the appearance can range widely depending on age and location of growth.

Western Wood Products Association SW First Ave., STE Portland, OR Phone: Fax: Email: [email protected]   The Pinaceae family is very large and contains some of the most commonly foraged conifers, such as pine, fir, Douglas-fir, spruce, hemlock, and true cedars.

Pine Tree Identification Pine trees (Pinus spp.) have needles that are bundled in clusters ofwith being most common, depending on the species. Each species of wood will burn (and dry) differently because each has it’s own density and moisture content. In order to get the most heat from your firewood, the moisture content should be 20% or less.

Freshly cut firewood or "green" firewood has a moisture content of 50% or more depending on the species. So as you can see, properly stacking. Pseudotsuga Carrière – Douglas-fir Species: Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco – Douglas-fir Subordinate Taxa.

The Plants Database includes the following 2 subspecies of Pseudotsuga menziesii. Click below on a thumbnail map or name for subspecies profiles. Native Introduced. Douglas fir's coarse texture can't easily be worked with hand tools.

And to avoid tearing grain, even power tool blades must be sharp. Yet, the wood grips nails and screws securely, and readily accepts all types of adhesives. Because Douglas fir contains fewer resins than many other softwoods, count on success with paint and clear finishes. The general distinctive characteristics of this wood are briefly noted, as are those of the other principal softwoods that may be used for the same purposes.

KEYWORDS: Pseudotsuga taxifolia P. douglasii, P. mucronata wood identification. Douglas fir seeds provide food for a number of small mammals, including chipmunks, mice, shrews, and red squirrels. Bears eat the sap of these trees.

Bears eat the sap of these trees. Many songbirds eat the seeds right out of the cone, and raptors, like northern spotted. identify lumber and wood products of north temperate species using only the naked eye and hand lens. Books on macroscopic wood anatomy and identification are.

91 generally targeted for the forest science audience and include works by Hoadley ( ), Core. et al. (), Edlin (), Panshin and deZeeuw (), and.Krosswood Doors Craftsman Douglas Fir Exterior Wood Door Collection Starting at $ Standard delivery.

Set your store to see local availability Build and Buy. Compare. Woodguard 4 in. x 4 in. x 8 ft. #2 Doug Fir Polymer Coated White Multi-Purpose Treated Post Model# $ 40 60 $ 40   So while you may have been able to identify the genus of the tree (Abies), there are still many more ways to classify these trees.

Common species of firs in North American include balsam, Pacific silver fir, California red fir, noble fir, grand fir, white fir, Fraser fir, and Douglas fir.